Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

childrenChildren of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

About: Seventeen-year-old Zélie, her older brother Tzain, and rogue princess Amari fight to restore magic to the land and activate a new generation of magi, but they are ruthlessly pursued by the crown prince, who believes the return of magic will mean the end of the monarchy.

Ofilia’s Thoughts: This book has some outstanding things in it. It also has some not so great things about it. Firstly, the cover is stunning. Whoever designed it should get an award. The story is told from three different points of view, which is interesting. The world, based on Nigerian mythology, is rich and interesting. The most exciting part of the entire book is that all of the characters are black and that the two main female characters are intense warriors. When I started the book, I thought this was going to be the best thing ever! And then the middle happened. It dragged and so much of it was typical YA novel nonsense. Zelie, the main character makes the same mistakes and doesn’t seem to learn or grow at all. The chapters from Inan’s point of view (he’s the crown prince mentioned above) are basically the same chapter over and over. He is caught between two worlds and each chapter he vacillates his loyalty between one or the other. He is constantly switching sides and his lack of backbone despite everything is annoying. The romance between Zelie and Inan is forced and unbelievable. It took me out of the narrative completely. The only character that has clear growth and evolves is Amari. Her point of view seemed the most honest and genuine to me. She actually used her brain and not just her gut. The action picks up in the final scenes and it ends on a powerful note, but I’m not sure the middle of the book is worth the journey.

now we rise

 

 

About Audviral, Mistress of the Stacks

Teen Services Librarian for the Rita & Truett Smith Public Library of Wylie, Texas.
This entry was posted in action packed, Diversity, Fantasy, female writers, multicultural, romance, series, women, world building and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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